Understanding the triage process in ED

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Triage processes are used in hospitals to ensure that everyone visiting the Emergency Department receives the right care at the right time, based on the urgency of your condition.

On arrival to the emergency department (ED) you will be assessed by an experienced triage nurse who will assign you to a category depending on the clinical urgency of your condition. All patients go through this triage process, even when you arrive by ambulance. Arriving by ambulance does not mean you will have priority.

Serious health problems will be seen first. All patients are seen by the triage nurse and assigned priority related to how unwell they are. Waiting times can be long due to high demand.

When talking to the triage nurse, be sure to include all relevant information, including test results and referral letters. Some treatments can be commenced in the waiting room, including blood tests, X-rays and pain relief.

Let the triage nurse know if you require an interpreter.

You are required not to eat or drink while waiting, unless you have discussed this with the triage nurse first. Your condition can be reassessed if it gets worse or changes while you are waiting.

Last reviewed October 23, 2017.

Medical services at our public hospital

Werribee Mercy Hospital offers a wide range of medical services, for both admitted patients (who are seen and stay in the inpatient wards) and for non-admitted patients (who visit the Outpatient Clinics Department). Emergency assessment and management is provided in the 24-hour Emergency Department.

Medical services at our public hospital

Surgical pathways

When you are a surgical patient at Mercy Health, you will follow an elective or emergency surgical pathway.

Surgical pathways

Outpatient access

Our Outpatient Clinics (also referred to as Specialist Clinics) provide a range of services where you can be referred for specialist opinion, management and treatment of various conditions.

Outpatient access